News and Advocacy Alerts

NSPN Member and Licensed Safe Place Agency, Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Works to End Human Trafficking


Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Arizona Partnership to End Domestic Trafficking 

How long has your agency provided RHY services?
Tumbleweed has been providing homeless and runaway services since 1974. Tumbleweed was awarded the Demonstration Domestic Trafficking grant on October 1, 2014. The Arizona Partnership to End Domestic Trafficking has been in providing trafficking specific services and community efforts for 15 months. 

Which RHY funded programs do you currently operate?
Our trafficking specific program is funded by the FYSB 2014 Demonstration Grant for Domestic Trafficking. We also have a Basic Center and Transitional Living Program. 

Briefly describe your service area:
Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development work with runaway and homeless youth age 12-25. Our partner agencies provide services for homeless youth and young adults and individuals who have experience trafficking age 18 and older.

What are some of the aspects of your DVHT program that you would highlight as successful?
The Arizona Partnership to End Domestic Trafficking combines three direct service agencies, along with a legal provider and two training and education agencies. The direct services agencies are able to leverage each other’s services if a client might need alternative placements, services and/or access to additional programs one might offer. Within the Partnership, we can follow best practice and keep a trauma-informed lens by being able to share information with the client’s consent to avoid client re-traumatization and provide more streamlined services access agencies. This has been a success that impacts our clients, case managers and improves program development by having a vast understand of our clients’ needs. Another success is our capacity to train, with our trainer Dr. Dominique Roe-Sepowitz, the Arizona Partnership to End Domestic Trafficking has trained 682 professionals and community members in the first year on human trafficking.

What are some of the challenges you have faced as an RHY grantee serving victim-survivors of human trafficking?
Our clients are homeless and extremely vulnerable to traffickers. Our client’s desire to achieve stability; however the process can be lengthy and can face many challenges. Many of our clients are in intimate relationships with their traffickers, experience domestic violence and have years of traumatic experiences that impact their ability to function in traditional educational and vocational programs. For some of our clients, the reliance on supportive services to meet their basic needs have been immense while establishing stability. Finally, the need for counseling services was an initial barrier as many clients do not have health care or even identification making the process complex and often frustrating for clients.  

Please share a short story of success, keeping in mind the confidentiality of all involved:
Sarah* arrived at Tumbleweed’s day resource center in February 2015. She had been trafficked through strip clubs and ended up in Arizona to reconnect with her birth family. She found herself homeless and being exploited. She was able to leave the life of trafficking shortly after being able to get into a shelter for young adults. Sarah has accessed our Learning Center, job skills development programs and regularly attended our Sex Trafficking Awareness and Recovery group while in the shelter. With the assistance of this grant, Sarah’s case manager connected her to our legal provider as she had concerns about warrants for her arrest in other states. With the knowledge provided about her criminal record she is moving forward toward applying for a finger print clearance card. After residing in our shelter for a couple months, she was able to move into her own place with the assistance of our program. In November 2015, she received multiple job offers, has been working full time and is able to pay a portion of her rent and bills.

*Name and some dates where changed

What information or experience would you be willing to share with other grantees?
The Arizona Partnership to End Domestic Trafficking hosted a Trafficking Summit in 2015 and is planning another for 2016; we created supportive materials available for distribution to assist in training and education. We are happy to share our documentation, flyers and program development to agencies!

What information would be helpful for you to receive from other grantees?
We believe it is important to understand other programs developed for trafficking victims, what is going well and obstacles. We would love more information on engaging domestic labor trafficking victims.   

How does your organization address Human Trafficking?
Our case managers are trained on sex and labor trafficking to help identify signs, techniques for engagement and how to assist victims of trafficking. We provide educational materials developed by Arizona State University and the Blue Campaign to agencies in Pima and Maricopa County to distribute. We table at events including victim services, LBGTQ events and host our own Summit to engage the community on learning about human trafficking in our community.

To learn more about Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, please visit: www.tumbleweed.org

Contact Name: Melissa Brockie, MSW, Director of Health and Wellness
Phone Number: 602-741-7353
Email: mbrockie@tumbleweed.org

 

January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

On December 31, 2014, President Barack Obama called upon businesses, national and community organizations, families, and all Americans to recognize the vital roles we can play in ending all forms of slavery as he proclaimed the month of January to be National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. 

We encourage you to join us throughout January as we come together to increase awareness of human trafficking and combine our efforts to prevent it. Each week, the following topics will be highlighted to help move awareness and prevention efforts forward.  These topics include: About Human TraffickingRaising AwarenessHuman Trafficking Prevention, and Celebrating Survivors. The topics were created to make it easy for YOU to make a difference. Learn more, share the resources with others, take action if you suspect trafficking, and celebrate the survivors of this terrible crime.

Ready to start making a difference now? 

1.    Spread the word. Let others know what you’re learning about human trafficking each week. If you’re using social media, use the primary hashtag #EndHumanTrafficking as well as the corresponding hashtag for the week. Show your support to #EndHumanTrafficking.

Sample Social Media Posts:

Facebook:
While slavery is often considered to be a thing of the past, we know that millions of men, women and children are trafficked in the U.S. and other countries around the world. Traffickers use force, fraud or coercion to lure victims into labor or commercial sexual exploitation. January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, a time to share information about slavery and human trafficking in order to effect change that will ultimately #EndHumanTrafficking. To learn more and get involved, please visit: http://www.nspnetwork.org/national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevention-month

Twitter:
It’s National Slavery & Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Learn how you can get involved in the fight to #EndHumanTrafficking http://bit.ly/1mGJmF2 

2.    Check back. Visit this page each week for topic updates, resources, and social media post samples.

About Human Trafficking:

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) defines “severe forms of human trafficking” as:

  • The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for:
  • Sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is inducted by force, fraud, and coercion, or in which the person inducted to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age; or,
  • Labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, and coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

Trafficking in persons, or human trafficking, is a widespread form of modern-day slavery. It is a crime that involves the exploitation of a person for the purpose of compelled labor or a commercial sex act through the use of force, fraud, or coercion. If a person younger than 18 is inducted to perform a commercial sex act, it is considered a crime regardless of whether there is any force, fraud, or coercion. Human traffickers target all populations around the world and in our own neighborhoods: women, men, youth, children, citizens, non-citizens, English speakers, non-English speakers. Some groups, such as runaway and homeless youth, native individuals, domestic violence victims, and LGBTQ population are particularly vulnerable to human trafficking. Victims are recruited and lured by traffickers with the false promise of a better life, love, and job opportunities. Later, traffickers use violence, threats, and manipulation to controls their victims. Homeless youth who are forced to trade sexual acts with an adult in exchange of something of value (i.e. shelter, food) are considered victims of domestic sex trafficking.

Human trafficking is the fastest growing criminal enterprise of this century, growing from a nine billion to a 32 billion dollar global industry in a little over a decade. There is no typical trafficker, and it has been shown that traffickers can be parents or other close family members, family friends, boyfriends/girlfriends, employers, smugglers or strangers.  Traffickers can be part of an organized enterprise or can work alone. Street gangs, for example, are known to traffic minors into the drug and sex markets. Don’t ignore the facts. Slavery exists and we can work together to end it.

Resources:

Sample Social Media Posts:
Share this week’s information and resources on your social media page(s).  Use the hashtag #SlaveryExists. Feel free to use the following sample social media posts below and download this week’s social media image at: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/images/stop%20labor%20trafficking.jpg

Facebook:
There are several types of #humantrafficking. Learning more is the first step to making a difference. #EndHumanTrafficking: http://www.nspnetwork.org/national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevention-month

Twitter:
Believe it or not, #slaveryexists. Chances are, it's happening nearby. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1mGJmF2 #EndHumanTrafficking

Raising Awareness:

Are you “aware” of how much raising awareness makes a difference?  It’s not uncommon to hear someone ask “How does raising awareness actually help make a difference?”  Unfortunately, some people choose to ignore awareness campaign efforts because they believe they are not making a difference. If you’ve heard this question – or even asked it yourself – try breaking the term “raising awareness” down.

Raising – to increase the amount, level, or strength of.
Awareness – knowledge or perception of a situation or fact.

Now ask yourself – Have you ever been able to make an actual difference for something you know nothing about?  Raising awareness increases the amount of knowledge you have about a specific topic such as human trafficking, therefore increasing the efforts to put an end to it. You are strongly encouraged to learn more about human trafficking.  It’s up to you to work together with others to end human trafficking. Consider the cost of your decision. 

Resources:

Sample Social Media Posts:
Share this week’s information and resources on your social media page(s).  Use the hashtag #ConsiderTheCost.  Feel free to use the following sample social media posts below and download this week’s social media image at: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/images/NSPN/consider-the-cost.jpg

Facebook:
Today is Human Trafficking Awareness Day – a time to share information, statistics and resources about human trafficking that occurs in the U.S. and across the world. In order to combat modern slavery, it’s crucial to inform and educate one another about the issue. The more people who know about human trafficking – the more people who may be willing to join the fight to #EndHumanTrafficking. Please click here to view resources and information that will help you raise awareness of human trafficking: http://www.nspnetwork.org/national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevention-month  #ConsiderTheCost

Twitter:
Make some noise and raise awareness about human trafficking: http://bit.ly/1mGJmF2 #EndHumanTrafficking #ConsiderTheCost

Human Trafficking Prevention:

Understanding human trafficking is just one of the first necessary steps that must be taken in order to #stopslavery.  But what’s next? Take steps to stop slavery by learning how to recognize the signs, talking to youth about what steps they can take to protect themselves and others, reporting suspected trafficking, and more.

By the time someone has been trafficked the system has already failed at what should be its primary goal: PREVENTION. We need to work to prevent human trafficking from occurring so the need for services doesn’t exceed the availability of services. Prevention efforts are not often sensational; however, focusing on preventing some of the risk factors that lead to an increased vulnerability to human trafficking will prove the adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  

Have you ever wondered what to expect from prevention efforts?  A recent NSPNsights blog An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure shares:

Prevention efforts:

  • provide information, resources, and safety planning skills to potential victims;
  • attempt to reduce the likelihood that an individual will become a trafficker;
  • change societal norms that blame victims;
  • empower community members to recognize and respond to instances of trafficking; and,
  • advocate for changes to policies and laws to reduce the occurrence of trafficking across vulnerable populations.   

Read more of this blog, including Nine Principles of effective Prevention Programs here: https://nspnetwork.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/an-ounce-of-prevention-is-worth-a-pound-of-cure/

 Resources:

Sample Social Media Posts:

Share this week’s information and resources on your social media page(s).  Use the hashtag #StopSlavery.  Feel free to use the following sample social media posts below and download this week’s social media image at: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/images/NSPN/stop-slavery.jpg

Facebook:
How do we #EndHumanTrafficking and #StopSlavery? It all starts with prevention. Learn the signs of human trafficking, know who to contact for help and understand what you can do to make your community a safer place: http://www.nspnetwork.org/national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevention-month

Twitter:
How do we #EndHumanTrafficking? It starts with prevention. http://bit.ly/1mGJmF2 #StopSlavery

If you think you’ve encountered a victim of human trafficking, call the national human trafficking hotline. In addition to the above indicators, the hotline’s multi- lingual operators can help service providers with identification. This hotline may also help you connect victims-survivors to available resources and connect you to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.  NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE: 888-373-7888

Celebrating Survivors:

Individuals who overcome tragedy, such as human trafficking, are survivors.  They are a living example that a person can get beyond their victimization and become a survivor. Organizations serving victims of human trafficking often work with survivors to offer positive coping strategies and act as role models for those in desperate need of relief.  Many organizations use the survivor-leadership model which helps develop the leadership and advocacy skills of human trafficking survivors for awareness-raising and advocacy efforts in the anti-human trafficking movement.  This model allows organizations to work with survivors by providing opportunities to selflessly share their stories without the risk of further exploitation. 

As survivors are celebrated this week, it’s also important to recognize organizations working to support survivors and end human trafficking.  NSPN would like to highlight a member organization and licensed Safe Place agency, Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development. 

Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development shares one of their success stories below: 
“Sarah* arrived at Tumbleweed’s day resource center in February 2015. She had been trafficked through strip clubs and ended up in Arizona to reconnect with her birth family. She found herself homeless and being exploited. She was able to leave the life of trafficking shortly after being able to get into a shelter for young adults. Sarah has accessed our Learning Center, job skills development programs and regularly attended our Sex Trafficking Awareness and Recovery group while in the shelter. With the assistance of this grant, Sarah’s case manager connected her to our legal provider as she had concerns about warrants for her arrest in other states. With the knowledge provided about her criminal record she is moving forward toward applying for a finger print clearance card. After residing in our shelter for a couple months, she was able to move into her own place with the assistance of our program. In November 2015, she received multiple job offers, has been working full time and is able to pay a portion of her rent and bills.”

*Name and some dates where changed

You may see more of this NSPN member highlight at:  http://www.nspnetwork.org/nspn-member-and-safe-place-agency-works-to-end-human-trafficking

Here are some additional organizations working with and celebrating victims-survivors of human trafficking: 

 Resources:

Sample Social Media Posts:

Share this week’s information and resources on your social media page(s).  Use the hashtag #StandWithSurvivors.  Feel free to use the following sample social media posts below and download this week’s social media image at: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/images/NSPN/stand-with-survivors.jpg  

Facebook:
We stand with victims-survivors of human trafficking and celebrate the incredible work being done by organizations across the country working the #EndHumanTrafficking. Their experiences, challenges and triumphs are both heart-breaking and awe-inspiring. Click here to read stories of victim-survivors of human trafficking: http://www.nspnetwork.org/national-slavery-and-human-trafficking-prevention-month #StandWithSurvivors

Here is a NSPN Member and Licensed Safe Place agency who is sharing their efforts to combat human trafficking in their community: http://www.nspnetwork.org/nspn-member-and-safe-place-agency-works-to-end-human-trafficking 

Twitter:
We stand with victims-survivors & celebrate the great work being done to #EndHumanTrafficking #StandWithSurvivors http://bit.ly/1mGJmF2

Our work to end human trafficking does not end in January.  This issue continues and the work to end and prevent this crisis should continue as well. Together we can end human trafficking.

 

 

 

 View 2017 NSHTPM Campaign Resources View 2018 NSHTPM Campaign Resources

 

 

Open Position: Development Associate

Posted 11/25/15

Reports To: President / CEO

Status: Full Time, Exempt

Salary: $40,000 - $45,000 annual, Commensurate with experience

National Safe Place Network (NSPN) seeks a Development Associate to assist with grants, foundations, and annual giving to help build and advance the mission of NSPN in the U.S. The ideal candidate is passionate about the cause of Safe Place, and youth and families in crisis. It is someone with strong previous experience and skill in researching, writing, securing, and managing grants from corporations and foundations; is someone with expertise and understanding on the national scope; is someone who is organized and efficient in performing job functions; and brings a record of leadership in managing and executing an effective grants strategy.

The Development Associate is responsible for researching, writing, and assisting with implementing a grants / foundation and annual campaign strategy to support NSPN's mission. In partnership with the President / CEO, Chief Strategic Initiatives Officer and Board of Directors, this position is responsible for securing $300,000 - $400,000 of the annual operations budget of NSPN.

Key Functions:

  • Responsible for conducting the full range of activities required to successfully assist with executing an annual grant writing strategy for NSPN including research, preparation, writing, editing, and submitting grants and foundation requests.
  • Perform prospect research on foundations and corporations for possible new funding opportunities.
  • Work with finance as requested to gather information necessary to report to corporate / foundation funders on current grant programs.
  • Comply with all grant reporting requirements as determined by each grant and foundation awards.
  • Serve as the lead for the NSPN Annual Campaign, including attendance at Annual Support Cabinet and leading the staff camaign.
  • Staff the Fund Development Committee of the Board of Directors.
  • Cultivate and provide stewardship to grant and foundation leadership (including foundation staff and board trustees) in conjunction with the CEO and CSI. Examples include setting up face-to-face meetings and on-site tours, providing written updates and reporting, and other appropriate communications.
  • Maintain current grant and foundation records in current database and in paper files, including all grant tracking and reporting.
  • Provide oversight and tracking of all program statistics and data relevant to quality assurance, development needs, and grant reporting.
  • Work with the CEO and Communications Department to provide input for all written materials for NSPN (including the annual report, newsletter and brochures).
  • Assist with other development activities as requested.

Knowledge and Skills:

  • Strong written communication skills; ability to write clear, structured, articulate, and persuasive proposals.
  • Strong editing skills.
  • Attention to detail.
  • Ability to meet deadlines.
  • Knowledge of fundraising information sources.
  • Experience with proposal writing and institutional donors.
  • Knowledge of basic fundraising techniques and strategies.
  • Knowledge and familiarity with research techniques for fundraising prospect research.
  • Strong Contributor in team environments.

Qualifications:

  • Minimum of two years experience with grant writing.
  • Previous experience with non-profit fundraising. Experience on a national level a plus.
  • Experience working in deadline-driven environments.
  • Ability to work well in a team environment, handle multiple assignments and meet deadlines.
  • Ability to monitor and meet income goals.
  • Abilities to be a strategic thinker, self starter, organized, and a highly effective communicator are critical attributes.
  • Experience with computer-based information systems - Microsoft Excel, Word, etc.
  • Demonstrate sound fiscal management.

Work Schedule:

  • Traditional work day, but with the flexibility to incorporate some evening and weekend development activities, events, or meetings as necessary.
  • Some off-site work (as needed) to make face-to-face contact with prospects or donors will help ensure full implementation of the overall fundraising strategy.
  • Occasional travel may be required.

Benefits:

The YMCA of Greater Louisville maintains a strong commitment to training and professional development, and was recognized as a 2011 "Top Work Place." As a new YMCA team members you will receive a comprehensive benefit package, including the opportunity to enroll in a rich retirement plan after two years of employment. Further, a community-wide family membership to the YMCA and other program discounts is included.

Submit your cover letter and resume by December 18, 2015.

Application Procedure: please send (email - preferred method) a cover letter and resume outlining demonstrable skill and past accomplishments to:

Laurie Jackson
President / CEO NSPN
2429 Crittenden Drive
Louisville, KY 40217
502-635-3660
ljackson@nspnetwork.org
 

NSPN Partners with Dignity U Wear to Provide Clothing Donations to Licensed Safe Place Agencies & NSPN Members

National Safe Place Network (NSPN) is pleased to announce a partnership with Dignity U Wear to provide brand-new clothing donations for youth served by licensed Safe Place agencies and NSPN members. This new benefit begins July 7, 2015.

Dignity U Wear is a national non-profit organization that works with the apparel industry to procure brand-new clothing. The organization then donates the clothing to agencies aligning with their mission.

Dignity U Wear focuses on three initiatives: Children and Families, Women and Girls in Crisis, and Youth and Adult Homelessness.

Clothing Donation Details: Prior to receiving clothing donations from Dignity U Wear, agencies must complete and submit the following documents:

Note: Clothing donated by Dignity U Wear cannot be sold to clients or anyone else.

Dignity U Wear will provide the clothing to eligible (agencies in good standing) licensed Safe Place and NSPN member agencies free of charge; however, they do ask agencies receiving the clothing to cover shipping costs from their warehouse in Jacksonville, Florida, to your organization.

If you would like to take advantage of this benefit for the youth you serve, please complete the partner agency application and submit all required documents via fax to 904.636.8649 or email to order@dignityuwear.org. In order to determine the impact and value of this benefit, please write on the application that you are affiliated with NSPN. This will enable Dignity U Wear to provide NSPN a report containing donation receipt data. 

Once Dignity U Wear receives all required documents, they will provide the clothing request cover sheets and forms to complete and you will be ready to start receiving donations. 

To learn more about Dignity U Wear and their mission, please visit www.dignityuwear.org. If you have specific questions related to the clothing or Dignity U Wear process, you may contact Cheryl Estevez, Agency Relations Manager, at 904.636.9455 or cestevez@dignityuwear.org.

NSPN and Dignity U Wear look forward to serving you and your agency. 

 

National Conference Draws Federal Officials, Youth Workers to Phoenix

Phoenix, Arizona (November 10, 2014) - More than 650 youth service workers and numerous federal officials from across the country gathered in Phoenix for the Family and Youth Services Bureau's (FYSB) 2014 National Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Grantees Conference, which took place November 11-13 at the Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak. During the two-and-a-half-day event, participants celebrated the 40th anniversary of the RHY Act and attended several networking and educational sessions.

"We were very excited to be in Phoenix for the 2014 FYSB National RHY Grantees Conference to network with peers and learn about innovative and rising trends in the youth services field," said Laurie Jackson, President/CEO of National Safe Place Network (NSPN), the agency that administers the Runaway and Homeless Youth Training and Technical Assistance Center (RHYTTAC). "We were also honored to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the RHY Act, a historic piece of legislation that provides funding for programs working to address the needs of runaway and homeless youth."

In addition to conference workshops and seminars, major conference events included:

40th Anniversary of RHY Act Celebration - Grantees reception honored the 40th anniversary of the signing of the RHY Act. This event included popular music from the past 40 years, a musical peformance by a youth from the Valley Youth House program and a candlelight vigil in honor of National Runaway Prevention Month.

Luncheon and Keynote Address - The National Clearinghouse on Families and Youth (NCFY) presented the winner of their mural contest. Matt D'Arrigo, Founder/CEO of A Reason to Survive (ARTS), delivered the keynote address along with Jessica Petrikowski, ARTS student and featured guest. ARTS is a nationally-recognized non-profit agency using arts and creativity to generate positive change and transformation in the lives of children and youth facing adversity.

Screening of The Homestretch - Grantees and conference participants viewed The Homestretch, a documentary film that follows three homeless teenagers as they brave Chicago winters, the pressures of high school and life alone on the streets to build a brighter future. Learn more about the film at: http://www.homestretchdoc.com/

Since 2012, NSPN has managed RHYTTAC, the training and technical assistance provider for more than 600 FYSB-funded RHY grantees across the country. RHYTTAC services are designed to supply grantee programs with tools and information which help lead to positive outcomes for children, youth and families in their communities. RHYTTAC is funded by the Department of Health and Human Services' FYSB.

 
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