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Valley Metro Designates 900 Buses as Safe Place Locations for Youth

Written by: Hillary Ladig, Communications Coordinator for National Safe Place Network, Media Release written by Ann Glaser, Public Information Specialist, Valley Metro

Safe Place is an outreach and prevention-based program for youth coordinated by licensed agencies in communities across the country. The program relies on community partnerships to strengthen the safety net for youth and to provide designated Safe Place locations where young people can access immediate help and safety. Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, located in Phoenix, Arizona, recently announced an expanded partnership with Valley Metro to add 900 buses to the community's network of Safe Place locations.

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November is National Runaway Prevention Month

Written by: Hillary Ladig & Elizabeth Smith Miller, NSPN Communications Team


Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away each year. If all of these young people lived in one city, it would be the fifth largest city in the U.S. These numbers are simply unacceptable, especially when you consider that many of these youth will end up on the streets. They are not bad kids; they are good kids caught up in bad situations. By supporting National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM), you're showing America's runaway and homeless youth that they are not invisible and they are not alone.

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Use Your Voice This Presidential Election

Written by: Katie Carter, Director of Research, Education & Public Policy for National Safe Place Network


Photo credit: https://mfgtodayblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/vote.jpg

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National Suicide Prevention Awareness Week

Written by: Elizabeth Smith Miller, Director of Marketing and Events, National Safe Place Network

Did you know that millions of Americans are directly affected by more than 37,000 suicides each year?   September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month with this week being National Suicide Prevention Awareness Week.  World Suicide Prevention Day is Saturday, September 10th.  Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people and your prevention efforts are critical.

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Cutting Through the Noise: Advocating for our Kids during the Presidential Election

Written by: Katie Carter, Director of Research, Education & Public Policy, National Safe Place Network

As a political junkie, I love presidential election years. I especially love years like this: where a few months ago there was no incumbent and wide-open races on both sides (depending on who you ask). These campaign cycles can also be incredibly frustrating. Candidates visit small towns where they would never otherwise set foot, eat state fair food, rub elbows with locals, and mug for photos. It all feels inauthentic. Fake. How can a long-serving U.S. senator really speak on behalf of working families? How can a billionaire relate to middle class workers? How can privileged white men and women relate to the plights of runaway youth? How can powerful people understand what it’s like to be homeless when they have never had to worry whether they will have a place to sleep, or a hot meal and shower waiting for them in the morning?

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August 12 is International Youth Day

The United Nations declared August 12 International Youth Day in 1999, providing an opportunity to celebrate young people around the world. The focus of this year’s International Youth Day is to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. You can read more about the agenda here: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld

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Use Pokemon go to Keep Kids Safe

Written by: Elizabeth Smith Miller, Communications Coordinator, National Safe Place Network

You might have heard of this little monster game called Pokemon Go.  This game is all the rage right now and has been downloaded more than 7.5 million times (and hasn’t even become available everywhere yet!)  You might be asking… “Why is NSPN talking about this?”  The answer is simple… “potential.”  With so much interest and emphasis on mobility, organizations have the potential to use the game to draw community members to them.  When community members come to you, there’s an opportunity to share available youth and family services and resources (including your organization and the local Safe Place program.)

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Live Life Unfiltered

Written by: Elizabeth Smith Miller, Director of Marketing and Events, National Safe Place Network

It’s no doubt technology has made life more…let’s say convenient. Technology has provided increased accessibility for education, safety, healthcare, and entertainment. It has also paved a new way to build “social connections”. But, with these new “social connections” – are we really connecting? Technology enables increased efficiency and productivity; however, it has disabled true conversation, connection, and togetherness. Take a moment and watch a powerful video authored by Prince Ea. In this video, he shares a simple message to encourage you to be balanced, mindful, and present. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRl8EIhrQjQ

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Seton Youth Shelters' Spring Cleaning Campaign

Written by: Karlaa Williams, Public Relations & Donor Associate, Seton Youth Shelters

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National Safe Place Week 2016

National Safe Place Week 2016 (#NSPWeek2016) is upon us! This nationally recognized week serves to raise awareness of Safe Place, an outreach and prevention program for youth in crisis. NSP Week is also a dedicated time to recognize the various partners who collaborate to offer immediate help and safety for young people. Partners include licensed Safe Place agencies, businesses, civic and social services organizations, volunteers, donors - both on the local and national levels. These partners stand together to strengthen the safety net for youth in America and that's exactly the reason we're celebrating this week!

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President Obama's FY 2017 Budget Released

Written by: Katie Carter, Director of Research, Education & Public Policy, National Safe Place Network

President Obama released his 2017 budget proposal last week. It includes some bright spots in funding for runaway and homeless youth programs and supports for child welfare programs. This is just a proposal though, and serves as a blueprint Congress will use to build its own budget.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: What's it All About?

Written by: Hillary Ladig, Communications Coordinator, National Safe Place Network

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (MLK Day), a time to commemorate Dr. King's vital role in the Civil Rights Movement. On MLK Day, Americans of every age and background will unite in a day of service as a way to transform Dr. King's life and teachings into community action that helps resolve social problems.

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National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

Written by: Susan Harmon, Director of Safe Place National Operations

By now you have probably seen, heard or read a great deal about human trafficking - what it is, who the victims are and where they are.  Here are just a few statistics NSPN would like to share with you:

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The Gift of Giving

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. Observed annually on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving in the U.S. and shopping events on Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday kicks off the charitable season, when many focus their holiday and end-of-year giving. 

As an organization serving youth in crisis and those who provide vital services to this population, NSPN relies on gifts from individuals and corporate partners to ensure an effective system of response for youth across the United States. NSPN utilizes your donated goods, time, and funds to reach youth in need of help and safety. Many youth who seek our services are scared and alone, with no place to go. Others just need someone to listen. If your family is in-tact and the children in your lives have not experienced the fear of being bullied, the scarring that comes with abuse, or the hunger that comes with neglect, you and those children are incredibly fortunate. NSPN is there for each youth and family that experience these and many other issues that make life challenging. Without your contributions, NSPN simply would not have the opportunity to continue this necessary work.

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Being a Veteran in the RHY Field

By: TC Cassidy, MPA, M.Div., CYC-P, Director of Technical Assistance / HTR3 Project Director, RHYTTAC / National Safe Place Network

When I was asked to write this blog as a veteran of the United States military and the RHY field, I struggled to find a balance between recognizing military veterans and recognizing veterans of the RHY field.

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November is National Runaway Prevention Month

As we begin gearing up for the holiday season in November, many of us are prompted to reflect on all the things for which we are thankful. Unfortunately, while many of us will be counting our blessings, an overwhelming number of young people across the country will be trying to figure out where they will be sleeping that night or where they can get their next meal.

To raise the visibility of these young people - runaway, throwaway, homeless, at-risk, or otherwise unstably housed - National Safe Place Network is participating in National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM) 2015. NRPM is spearheaded each year by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) and National Network for Youth (NN4Y). The goals of NRPM are two-fold:

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October is National Bullying Prevention Month

By: Hillary Ladig, Communications Coordinator, National Safe Place Network

October is upon us - a month many associate with the start of the fall season, cooler temperatures, Halloween and pumpkins. In addition to these common themes, the month also brings to light the topic of bullying prevention. October is National Bullying Prevention Month, a time when communities unite to raise awareness of bullying prevention through events, activities, outreach and education.

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Labor of Love

Written by: Laurie Jackson, President / CEO, National Safe Place Network

For nearly thirty years I have been working with and advocating for youth who have runaway, are homeless, or otherwise in crisis. I find it gratifying to remember the successes of the work: the families who were reunited after a tough crisis created a separation. Even when a separation is only for a brief time it may create angst for the family. I also recall the times that sadness overwhelmed my head and heart when, despite all efforts, a divide remained following service. The trials and tribulations of youth work provides an emotional sense that is a high crest on the wave and the opposite - the crash of the same wave and the ripple effect it leaves in its wake.

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TXT 4 HELP Q&A

With: Maria Huebner, MSW, LCSW, Follow-Up Programs Manager, Behavioral Health Response (BHR)

*This piece was originally published in the Winter 2013 version of National Safe Place's newsletter, "The Connection"

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A Personal Reflection on Leadership

Written by: Tammy Hopper, Chief Strategic Initiatives Officer, National Safe Place Network & RHYTTAC

Writing about leadership is bizarre. If you write about something, you should know what you are writing about. If you profess to know a lot about leadership – or at least enough to write about it – does that mean that you are holding yourself out as a role model? In trying to determine the most accurate, though totally subjective, answer to my own question, I decided to think about the leaders I know or have known in my life. First, there was my mom. She led through a balance of compassion and control. My father led through years of hard work followed by years of stories of what he learned by working so hard. My first pastor, Brother Fred, was a Native American leading a small Christian church in rural Mississippi. He led by demonstrating that words of kindness may soothe but never eradicate the pain caused by words of hate. My high school English teacher led by gentle challenges to all of his students that you are never as accomplished today as you could be tomorrow. An early social work supervisor led by showing patience, persistence and passion – all while working with the kids rather than hanging out in the office. Each of these souls imprinted their form of leadership on the way I feel and think about the world. So, I wonder. Is this leadership? Is it impacting another in such a way that the other person is forever changed by the encounter? If so, can there be negative leaders? Surely, there are. If not, many of the warnings I received as a child were simply scare tactics meant to keep me on the straight and narrow (I think they worked to well.) I believe there are leaders who lead without ever realizing people are paying attention. I know there are leaders who use their skills and personal characteristics to gain more for themselves than they ever help others achieve. I think there are leaders who believe that they should be followed and who criticize those individuals who refuse to follow them. Luckily, I don’t work with these people. I don’t see any of these leaders in partnering organizations or in our membership. I haven’t spotted these leaders at our workshops or conferences. In our world, I see the other leaders. The ones who understand that a simple gesture of good will, an act of patience, a sharing of resources, a hug of support or a nod of validation can be critical. These leaders don’t look for THE moment to make a difference because they realize that EVERY moment is an opportunity to create change. John Quincy Adams said, “if your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader”. Our social service field is filled with leaders at all levels. Youth, professional youth care workers, managers, clinicians, executives, administrative staff, drivers, volunteers, cooks and receptionists - each spread ripples of positive impact in the streams in which they swim. I guess maybe the most often missed characteristics of leadership are humility and gratitude. I am learning to be a leader. Thanks to all of you who are learning with me.

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